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Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump held his first campaign rally in Pennsylvania of 2019 just days after former Vice President Joe Biden officially kicked off his presidential over the weekend, as both party's continue to make plays for the critical state.

For Trump, Pennsylvania holds weight: The state was crucial to the president's 2016 victory, and it again will be for his reelection hopes. The president pulled off a narrow victory in Pennsylvania in 2016, becoming the first Republican to win the state in nearly two decades.

The president landed in dramatic fashion on Air Force One -- to cheers from the crowd -- and then took the stage. Trump wasted no time touting the booming United States economy.

"When you've had the best employment numbers in history, when you have the best unemployment numbers in history. When you have the best economy we've ever had -- how the hell do you lose this election?" the president asked the raucous crowd in Montoursville, Pennsylvania.

Trump continued to champion the American economy, saying that the U.S. has the greatest economy anywhere in the world.

Trump also explained that one key reason he came back to Pennsylvania is because of Tuesday's "crucial" Pennsylvania's 12th Congressional District special election, where Republican state Rep. Fred Keller is looking to defeat Democrat Marc Friedenberg and replace Republican Tom Marino, who resigned shortly after the new Congress began earlier this year.

"You get out tomorrow. It's a little bit of a referendum," Trump urged his supporters Monday. "They'll say, 'President Trump came to Pennsylvania, and he went back home, a loser.'"

"I never want to be called a loser," Trump added.

Before the president took the stage, his eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., hyped up the hot crowd, many of whom had waited hours in line to get into the event. This marked the president's son's first appearance at a campaign rally since being called back to Congress for further testimony.

"They still can't let it go. God knows I gotta deal with that one myself despite 30 hours of testimony," Trump Jr. said. "I've done, you know, 25 to 30 hours of testimony in front of multiple committees, Senate, Congress. The Mueller report cites my congressional testimony. They cite my Senate testimony. Think about it. They cite my stupid Twitter account."

"They've looked at it all. And we're clear, but they still want to send you in there to go back and two years later, answer questions about something because Michael Cohen," Trump Jr. added.

Also ahead of the rally on Monday, the Trump campaign told ABC News that the president was excited to to tout the economy in the Keystone State, a message that will likely be embraced by voters as Pennsylvania is experiencing record low unemployment at 3.8% in April, the lowest level since 1976. The state's unemployment numbers are largely reflective of the declining unemployment rate throughout the country, frequently championed by the president at both the White House and on the campaign trail.

But despite a booming economy and his previous upset victory, Trump's campaign follows Republican defeats in the 2018 midterms. Democrats clenched key statewide races including the U.S. Senate and the gubernatorial race. A year prior, Democrat Conor Lamb claimed victory in a special House election by captivating voters in the heart of Trump territory, a district the president won in 2016.

As Republicans acknowledge warning signs ahead of the 2020 election, Democrats hope to capitalize on the momentum. Just a few hours away from where Trump will address his supporters in Montoursville, voters in Philadelphia received a rival pitch from a former vice president who hopes to challenge Trump.

"If the American people want a president to add to our division, to lead with a clenched fist, closed hand and a hard heart, to demonize the opponents and spew hatred -- they don't need me. They've got President Donald Trump," Joe Biden told a crowd during his campaign kickoff speech in his home state of Pennsylvania.

"I am running to offer our country -- Democrats, Republicans and independents -- a different path," Biden continued.

The former vice president also claimed the Trump administration "inherited an economy from Obama-Biden administration."

"That was given to him. Just like he inherited everything else in his life," Biden said.

Trump went on a Twitter spree earlier this month in an attempt to show he has support from firefighters after Biden netted a key endorsement from one of the nation's largest firefighter unions. The pair have exchanged sharp words, with Biden calling Trump the "Divider-in-Chief" and the president labeling Biden "sleepy creepy Joe" following allegations of sexual misconduct against the former vice president.

The state's Republican party released a statement in response to Biden's campaign announcement calling his campaign one that "seeks to paint over the failures of the Obama-Biden years and his record as U.S. senator while offering nothing but a continuation of those failed policies."

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- A federal judge on Monday ruled in favor of House Democrats in their efforts to obtain President Donald Trump’s financial records, marking the first legal victory for Democrats as the Trump administration stonewalls their attempts at congressional oversight.

“It is not for the court to question whether the Committee’s actions are truly motivated by political considerations.” Judge Amit Mehta wrote in a ruling Monday. “Accordingly, the court will enter judgment in favor of the Oversight Committee.”

President Trump and the Trump Organization filed suit against the Democratic chairman of the House Oversight Committee, Rep. Elijah Cummings, last month, seeking relief from his subpoena request for the president’s financial records.

The court also denied their request for a stay pending appeal.

The president and his legal team decried Democrats’ efforts to obtain Trump’s financial information as an “all-out political war,” in which “subpoenas are their weapon of choice.”

But in his order on Monday, Judge Mehta, an Obama appointee, sided with Democrats, whom he wrote have “facially valid legislative purposes” to obtain information requested in their subpoena of Mazars USA, the president’s former accounting firm.

"It is simply not fathomable that a Constitution that grants Congress the power to remove a President for reasons including criminal behavior would deny Congress the power to investigate him for unlawful conduct — past or present — even without formally opening an impeachment inquiry," Mehta wrote.

Cummings served a subpoena to Mazars USA in April seeking ten years of the president's financial records in an effort to corroborate elements of Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen's testimony before the committee. Cohen claimed that Trump had defrauded insurance companies by misrepresenting the value of his assets.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, a California Democrat whose committee is also seeking information from the Trump administration, reacted to news of the decision, calling it "very important."

“It shows that the courts understand the importance of oversight even if the president does not,” Schiff said.

"Mazars USA will respect the legal process and fully comply with its legal obligations. We believe strongly in the ethical and professional rules and regulations that govern our industry, our work and our client interactions. As a matter of firm policy and professional rules we do not comment on the work we conduct for our clients," Mazars USA spokesperson Jennifer Farrington told ABC News on Monday.

Speaking to reporters as he departed the White House Monday evening, Trump said that he plans to appeal the judge's ruling.

"Yeah, they'll appeal it. They'll appeal it. Sure they'll appeal it," Trump said.

The president "disagreed" with the ruling and slammed the judge for being appointed by Obama.

"We disagree with that ruling. It's crazy because you look at this never happened to any other president. They're trying to get a redo. Trying to get what we used to call in school a do-over and if you look, you know, we had no collusion, we had no obstruction. We had no nothing," Trump said.

"The Democrats were very upset with the Mueller report as perhaps they should be, but, I mean the country is very happy about it because there was never anything like that. They're trying to get a do-over or redo. You can't do that as far as the financials are concerned it's totally the wrong decision by obviously an Obama appointed he was a recent Obama appointed judge," Trump added.

The House Oversight Committee was not immediately available for comment. The Trump Organization and lawyers for President Trump – both plaintiffs in the case – did not immediately respond to request for comment.

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump has directed former White House counsel Donald McGahn not to testify on Tuesday before Congress about events relating to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, the White House said on Monday.

Late Monday afternoon, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler said his committee would meet as planned Tuesday morning and McGahn was expected to appear.

"The Mueller Report documents a shocking pattern of obstruction of justice," Nadler said in a statement. "The President acted again and again—perhaps criminally—to protect himself from federal law enforcement.

"Don McGahn personally witnessed the most egregious of these acts. President Trump knows this. He clearly does not want the American people to hear firsthand about his alleged misconduct, and so he has attempted to block Mr. McGahn from speaking in public tomorrow."

Earlier, in a letter to Nadler, White House counsel Pat Cipollone wrote "that McGahn is absolutely immune from compelled congressional testimony with respect to matters occurring during his service as a senior adviser to the President" citing previous Department of Justice Office of Legal Counsel opinions, along with OLC guidance specific to McGahn's testimony.

“The immunity of the President’s immediate advisers from compelled congressional testimony on matters related to their official responsibilities has long been recognized and arises from the fundamental workings of the separation of powers. Those principles apply to the former White House Counsel," the Office of Legal Counsel opinion on McGahn reads. "Accordingly, Mr. McGahn is not legally required to appear and testify about matters related to his official duties as Counsel to the President.”

Because of this "constitutional immunity" -- Cipollone wrote -- "the President has directed Mr. McGahn not to appear at the Committee's scheduled hearing on Tuesday, May 21, 2019."

"The Department of Justice has provided a legal opinion stating that, based on long-standing, bipartisan, and Constitutional precedent, the former Counsel to the President cannot be forced to give such testimony, and Mr. McGahn has been directed to act accordingly. This action has been taken in order to ensure that future Presidents can effectively execute the responsibilities of the Office of the Presidency," press secretary Sarah Sanders said in a statement.

"The Democrats do not like the conclusion of the Mueller investigation – no collusion, no conspiracy, and no obstruction – and want a wasteful and unnecessary do-over." she said.

Nadler rejected those arguments.

"This move is just the latest act of obstruction from the White House that includes its blanket refusal to cooperate with this Committee," his statement continued. "It is also the latest example of this Administration’s disdain for law. This identical approach was rejected by a federal court in the Miers case, which held that even senior advisors to the President cannot simply refuse to appear in response to a congressional subpoena.

"It is absurd for President Trump to claim privilege as to this witness’s testimony when that testimony was already described publicly in the Mueller Report. Even more ridiculous is the extension of the privilege to cover events before and after Mr. McGahn’s service in the White House," Nadler said.

Earlier this month, the White House instructed McGahn not to comply with a subpoena from House Democrats for documents related to Mueller’s investigation.

Cipollone argued at the time that “McGahn does not have the legal right to disclose these documents to third parties” and asked that instead of directing requests for documents to McGahn’s attorney, the committee direct the requests to the White House.

McGahn was a central figure in the Mueller report and cooperated extensively with the special counsel’s probe. He met with Mueller's team multiple times for more than 30 hours and questioned more extensively than any other member of the White House staff who went in for an interview.

"Mr. McGahn is a critical witness to many of the alleged instances of obstruction of justice and other misconduct described in the Mueller report,” Nadler wrote last month in a press release accompanying his subpoena request. “His testimony will help shed further light on the President's attacks on the rule of law, and his attempts to cover up those actions by lying to the American people and requesting others do the same."

Mueller had requested to speak with McGahn about the circumstances surrounding former FBI Director James Comey’s firing and his reported involvement in the events surrounding Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recusing himself from the Russia investigation, the sources said.

ABC News previously reported that McGahn was among the White House staffers who were against any notion of President Trump’s firing of Mueller last June when the president wanted to do just that, a source said.

After news broke that Trump ordered McGahn to fire the special counsel, Trump pressured McGahn to deny that he had been directed to do so, even suggesting to aides that he would fire him unless he complied. Mueller concludes that there is evidence to suggest Trump acted this way to impede his investigation, according to the special counsel's report.

Mueller concluded that "Substantial evidence indicates that in repeatedly urging McGahn to dispute that he was ordered to have the Special Counsel terminated, the President acted for the purpose of influencing McGahn's account in order to deflect or prevent further scrutiny of the President's conduct towards the investigation."

There is precedent for past administrations to declare immunity from congressional testimony based on an Office of Legal Counsel opinion.

For example, in 2014 the Obama administration blocked senior adviser and director of the White House Office of Political Strategy, David Simas, from testifying before the House Oversight Committee.

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Win McNamee/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, from the tobacco state of Kentucky, on Monday unveiled federal legislation to raise the minimum age to purchase e-cigarettes and all other tobacco products in the U.S. from 18 to 21.

The Tobacco-Free Youth Act is a measure that McConnell and his Democratic co-sponsor of the bill, Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, say is aimed at reducing teen use of e-cigarettes, which the duo call a “public health crisis.”

“It’s our responsibility as parents and public servants to do everything we can to keep these harmful products out of high schools and out of youth culture. We need to put the national age of purchase at 21,” McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday.

Kentucky and Virginia have the highest rates of death caused by smoking, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC reports that from 2017 to 2018, youth e-cigarette users increased by 1.5 million, with more than 1 in 4 high school students having reported using a tobacco product in the past 30 days.

Kentucky is the nation’s second-largest tobacco producer.

“Now, I recognize I might seem like an unusual candidate to lead this charge. I’m the senior senator from Kentucky. I’ve consistently stood up for all Kentucky farmers, including our tobacco farmers. I championed the tobacco buyout back in 2004,” McConnell said.

“But actually, my long experience with this subject and my commitment to farm families are part of what’s convinced me that now is the right time to do this,” he said.

McConnell said on Monday that enacting this legislation is one of his “highest priorities.” As the keeper of the keys on the Senate floor, it’s all but certain his legislation will get a floor vote in the near future after it is vetted and debated in the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

Kaine is a member of that committee.

“Today, we are coming together to side with young people’s health. With this bipartisan legislation, Senator McConnell and I are working to address one of the most significant public health issues facing our nation today,” Kaine, who signed a law banning smoking in bars and restaurants as Virginia’s governor, said in a statement provided to ABC News.

“Raising the tobacco age to 21 is a critical part of our efforts to improve public health and keep tobacco products out of schools and away from our children,” he said.

The federal law would make it illegal to sell tobacco products to anyone under the age of 21 years old in all states.

Members of the military would also have to be 21 to purchase tobacco products.

McConnell had reportedly planned to exempt service members from his legislation, but after talking with constituents and public health advocates, he believes there should be no exceptions, according to Kentucky newspaper Lexington Herald-Leader.

“We’ve had plenty of evidence ... that this is a public health problem of significant proportions,” McConnell told the Lexington Herald-Leader, adding that he doesn’t think the military should be “treated differently on a public health issue.”

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, a non-profit advocacy organization, told ABC News they are currently reviewing the legislation.

"We are currently reviewing this legislation to determine whether it meets our criteria for a strong bill ..." the group said in a statement to ABC News.

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shakzu/iStock(WASHINGTON) -- A plan by U.S. Customs and Border Protection to ease pressure at processing stations in Texas by potentially flying migrants to other states fell apart this weekend after the White House intervened and President Donald Trump declared the country "FULL," forcing CBP to backpedal and look for new ways to handle the thousands of undocumented migrants arriving each week.

The incident underscores the heightened political environment in which border officials are operating. Authorities along the U.S.-Mexico border say they encountered some 4,500 undocumented migrants in the past week alone, and have stopped some half a million people since early September.

Florida's Broward County Mayor Mark Bogen said Monday he was relieved that the plan was no longer in place.

"We understand the governor spoke to the president and we've been informed they're not coming to south Florida," he told ABC News on Friday. "I'm thankful to our governor and our elected officials for working together to determine and solve a problem."

Last week, Bogen and other local officials in Florida began pushing back after the Palm Beach County sheriff said he was told U.S. Border Patrol planned to send as many as 1,000 migrants a month from El Paso, Texas, to Florida -- split between Palm Beach County and Broward County. Bogen said he quickly began notifying nonprofits and shelters, but warned that the president would be creating a "homeless encampment" of undocumented migrants unless he provided federal assistance.

The concern quickly spread to Florida's Republican Sen. Marco Rubio and Gov. Ron DeSantis -- a Trump ally -- who began pressing the administration for answers.

CBP officials scrambled to respond on Friday, convening a call with reporters in which an official confirmed that federal border authorities were considering whether other available facilities might be able to process migrants. The official said two flights had already been used, including one from Texas to San Diego.

The official cautioned reporters that there were no flights planned to Florida "at this time," but that the agency was looking at "capacity building and contingency plans across the nation," with preference given to large ports of entry along the northern border and in coastal states.

"This is an emergency," the official said. "The entire system is overwhelmed, and we are simply trying to safely get them out of our custody as quickly as possible."

By Saturday, however, DeSantis was already on the phone with Trump. According to the Republican governor, Trump told DeSantis that he "did not approve, nor would approve, sending immigrants who illegally cross the border to Florida."

By the end of the day Saturday, acting Commissioner John P. Sanders issued a statement decrying "inaccurate reports in the press" and stating "CBP has no plans to transport people in our custody to northern or coastal border facilities, which include Border Patrol stations in Florida."

On Sunday, acting Homeland Secretary Secretary Kevin McAleenan said that the agency decided against using Florida or other states because the processing stations were too small.

"We looked at it from a planning perspective: What's prudent here?" McAleenan told told CBS' "Face the Nation." "We do have stations in Florida. We have stations on the northern border. They're very small stations. They have a few agents that are busy patrolling their areas. There wasn't going to be an effective use of resources. But yeah, we had to look at all options."

Trump on Sunday also blamed "false reporting" and declared the plan dead.

"Our Country is FULL, will not, and can not, take you in!" he tweeted.

Border authorities are likely to have little choice, however, to let the migrants in while they await for their asylum claims to be heard. U.S. law allows people to claim asylum at the border and to plead their case before an immigration judge. The Trump administration has enacted a "Remain in Mexico" policy, which has forced some asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their case works its way through an overwhelmed system. But that policy has not been applied across the border and is facing legal challenges in court.

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- After Rep. Justin Amash tweeted Saturday that he believes President Donald Trump “engaged in impeachable conduct” by obstructing the investigation into the 2016 presidential election, the Michigan Republican returns to the Capitol on Monday where he can expect to face more attacks from the president's fiercest loyalists.

At the same time, he's winning praise from Democrats, who see Amash as the first break in GOP opposition to possible impeachment, allowing them to claim the effort is bipartisan.

Amash, who is already facing a primary challenger in the wake of his tweets, said he reached these conclusions “only after having read Mueller’s redacted report carefully and completely,” contending further that Attorney General William Barr “intended to mislead the public about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s analysis and findings.”

Amash was back on Twitter Monday afternoon, defending himself with 10 more tweets against people who contend there are no underlying crimes so the president could not have intended to illegally obstruct the investigation, and therefore cannot be impeached.

On Sunday, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy called Amash a "lightweight," contending he votes "more with Nancy Pelosi than he ever votes with me."

"What he wants is attention in this process. He's not a criminal attorney. He's never met Mueller. He's never met Barr. And now he's coming forward with this?" McCarthy, R-Calif., said. “This is exactly what you would expect from Justin. He never supported the president. And I think he's just looking for attention," he said on the Fox program "Sunday Morning Futures."

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, the No. 2 Republican in the lower chamber, defended Trump and Barr over Amash’s critique of the Russia investigation, telling Fox News’ Ed Henry that “some people want to keep dragging this on.”

“I think anybody who knows Justin’s background knows that he sometimes goes a different route that the rest of the republicans in our conference and this is clearly one of those cases,” Scalise, R-La., said Sunday. “You don’t see anybody else agreeing with him and in fact I strongly disagree with that take.”

Trump has also received support or sorts from a former political 2016 GOP rival, Sen. Mitt Romney, who said Amash “reached a different conclusion than I have.”

“I respect him. I think it's a courageous statement,” told CNN’s Jake Tapper. “But I believe that to make a case for obstruction of justice, you just don't have the elements that are evidenced in this document.”

Romney added that he believe that “an impeachment call is not only something that relates to the law, but also considers practicality and politics.”

“The American people just aren't there,” he said. “And I think those that are considering impeachment have to look also at the jury, which would be the Senate. The Senate is certainly not there either.”

Amash, a five-term lawmaker, has never been the most popular conservative on Capitol Hill, often projecting his libertarian principles into votes against bills with near-unanimous bipartisan support.

Democrats, however, have praised Amash for his newly publicized position on impeachment.

Amash’s bravery has also quickly earned him a primary challenger, Michigan state Rep. Jim Lower.

Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has stopped short of calling for impeachment, saying she won’t pursue impeachment until public sentiment changes and there is bipartisan support for it. But she has left the door open to the prospect, though concedes the process would likely end with the president’s acquittal in the GOP-led Senate.

Amash, 39, opposed Trump’s nomination during the 2016 primaries and aligns with Trump on about just 62 percent of the issues and votes, the lowest among any current Republicans after Rep. Walter Jones died earlier this year, according to FiveThirtyEight.

Voting out of sync with congressional leadership has not always won favor from party leaders, though Amash is just about as conservative as they come in Congress. He is a founding member of the House Freedom Caucus, and sits on its board. FreedomWorks has awarded 100 on its legislative scorecard. Conservative Review gave him an A on its Liberty Score. Amash has tallied an 86 percent lifetime score at Heritage Action for America.

The libertarian opposed Trump’s primary campaign and in the past couple years close observers believe he has grown frustrated with the caucus’s leadership, including Trump loyalist Mark Meadows, the chairman of the caucus, and Jim Jordan, another founding HFC member and chairman emeritus.

In 2017, Amash cried after he missed the first vote of his career, stretching across 4,289 roll-call votes. He is known for personally explaining each vote to constituents on his Facebook page.

Amash has been encouraged to challenge Trump’s reelection campaign by seeking the Libertarian nomination. While Amash has refused to rule out the possibility, he hasn’t pursued it publicly.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris drew a crowd of thousands on Sunday afternoon in her home state of California at a rally at Los Angeles Southwest College – a place where she hopes to make deeper inroads with black voters.

The school is located in the heart of South Los Angeles and has one of the highest percentages of black students out of all the city's community colleges. Harris’ speech also took place in a state that awards more than 400 Democratic delegates during the presidential primary.

During her speech, Harris touched on a proposal – unveiled Monday – to close the gender pay gap – and hold corporations accountable if they don't comply.

The plan would make large companies pay a fine if they don't obtain an "equal pay certification" from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. A senior campaign official says for every 1 percent wage gap that exists, the company would be fined 1 percent of its profits. They will additionally be required to post on their company's website if they are certified with paying men and women equally.

"It is a proposal to address the reality of pay inequity and the disparity of pay based on gender. Women are paid on average 80 cents to the dollar for the exact same work as men," Harris told reporters after the event. "Black women are paid 61 cents on the dollar. Latinas are paid 53 cents on the dollar. And this has real implications not just for those women but for their families and for their communities and for society...These statistics and their disparities have not much changed over the decades in spite of all the talk of how we need to address the obvious unfairness of it."

African American voters are critical to gaining traction in the presidential primary, and the largely Democratic group is expected to make up 12.5 percent of the electorate in 2020, according to the Pew Research Center. In South Carolina, the first state to hold a primary in the South, African Americans make up nearly 30 percent of the population.

"Black voters will play a disproportionate role with helping select the Democratic Party nominee for president,” Andra Gillespie, associate professor of political science at Emory University, told ABC News in April. She added that African Americans are the most “loyal Democratic voting bloc in the United States."

Part of the voting process for many black voters will be deciding if a candidate’s policies will benefit the community. Many black progressives have raised concern about Harris’ previous positions on issues like criminal justice and financial reform.

As California’s former attorney general, Harris had a record of backing tough penalties for the parents of truant kids -- a position she later said she regretted -- and opposing federal oversight of California's prisons.

Critics of Harris say her decisions as a long-time prosecutor do not align with the progressive values of the party.

While Harris personally opposes the death penalty, she defended it as California's attorney general in 2014. She also won a $25 billion settlement for California homeowners hit by the foreclosure crisis, but drew criticism when she did not prosecute Steven Mnuchin's OneWest Bank for foreclosure violations in 2013.

To help counter some of these criticisms, Harris has focused on appealing directly to black voters, lunching with Rev. Al Sharpton and speaking to the nation's largest NAACP chapter in Detroit.

In South Carolina, the senator spoke to over 3,000 black women at a sorority event for Alpha Kappa Alpha Inc., a historic African American organization which she joined as a college student at Howard University.

Historically black colleges and universities, such as Howard, have been at the center of Harris’ campaign. She chose the campus to host a press conference shortly after announcing her bid for president.

"Howard University is one of the most important aspects of my life. And it is where I first ran for my first elected office," Harris told reporters.

Aimee Allison, founder of She the People, a political organization for women of color, told ABC News that candidates who can successfully reach out to the black community and black women voters will be much more competitive.

"The campaign trail is littered with people who recognize too late who the most valuable voters in the coalition are,” Allison said.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump blasted Fox News on Sunday for airing a town hall with Democratic candidate Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana.

Trump said he couldn't believe the network was "wasting airtime on Mayor Pete, as Chris Wallace likes to call him."

....who got them there. Chris Wallace said, “I actually think, whether you like his opinions or not, that Mayor Pete has a lot of substance...fascinating biography.” Gee, he never speaks well of me - I like Mike Wallace better...and Alfred E. Newman will never be President!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 19, 2019

Brit Hume of Fox News responded by tweeting that at least Buttigieg was "willing to be questioned by Chris Wallace, something you've barely done since you've been president. Oh, and covering candidates of both parties is part of the job of a news channel."

Say this for Buttigieg. He’s willing to be questioned by Chris Wallace, something you’ve barely done since you’ve been president. Oh, and covering candidates of both parties is part of the job of a news channel. https://t.co/D8yQE2kfYF

— Brit Hume (@brithume) May 20, 2019

In addition to attacking Fox News for its Buttigieg special, the president also tweeted twice about his own interview, also on Fox News, that was airing at the time.

Here's a short clip of Buttigieg that was posted to his Twitter feed:

Even though some of these hosts are not always there in good faith, I think a lot of people tune into this network in good faith.

Whether it’s going on Fox or going into places where Democrats haven’t been seen much, we have to find people where they are–not change our values. pic.twitter.com/xNHoD0uzE4

— Pete Buttigieg (@PeteButtigieg) May 20, 2019

Buttigieg, a 37-year-old voted "most likely to be president" as a high school senior, speaks a half-dozen languages, graduated from Harvard, was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford and served in Afghanistan with the Navy Reserve.

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JPecha/iStock(WASHINGTON) -- It's decision time at the Supreme Court.

After months of hearing oral arguments in dozens of cases, the justices convene Monday -- and for the five Mondays thereafter, through June 24 -- to release their final opinions of the term.

They are also expected to weigh in on several petitions to the court by plaintiffs seeking appeals involving DACA, abortion and same-sex discrimination. The court will choose whether or not to take up those issues in the fall term.

Here are several of the cases ABC News has been following and which will be decided in the next few weeks:

Indian reservation boundaries and the death penalty -- Carpenter v. Murphy

Did Congress effectively disestablish the Creek Nation Indian reservation in Oklahoma or are its boundaries still in effect? The outcome could determine whether Patrick Murphy, a member of the Creek Nation sitting on the state's death row, will be executed or head back to federal court for a new trial.

Double jeopardy -- Gamble v. U.S.

Can a state and the federal government each prosecute you for the exact same crime? Should the so-called "separate sovereigns" exception to the Constitution's ban on double jeopardy continue? The case has potential implications for the pardon power of the American president.

Osteoporosis drug Fosamax and dangerous bone fractures -- Merck v. Albrecht

Can a class-action lawsuit proceed against drug maker Merck over debilitating osteoporosis drug side-effects? Or, did an FDA decision to block a proposed warning label for the drug preempt state tort claims? Hundreds of Fosamax users have been impacted and the decision could set a precedent for future drug-harm claims.

Native American hunting rights -- Herrera v. Wyoming

Can members of the Crow Tribe hunt on federal land under an 1868 treaty or did creation of the state of Wyoming and the Bighorn National Forest negate those terms? Clayvin Herrera was fined more than $8,000 for hunting elk in the forest. He says the treaty protects him, but the state says his rights ceased to exist.

Alcohol sales and state regulations -- Tennessee Wine & Spirits Retailers Association v. Blair

Since the end of Prohibition, the sale of alcohol in the U.S. has been regulated almost exclusively by state and local governments. But when do those regulations go too far? The court will decide whether Tennessee's strict residency requirements for retailers of beer, wine and liquor are constitutional. It's the biggest 21st Amendment case in a generation.

Cross-shaped war memorials -- American Legion v. American Humanists

When can religious symbols be placed on public land and maintained with taxpayer dollars? This case will decide the fate of a 40-foot, 16-ton Latin cross in Bladensburg, Maryland, and could impact millions of other crosses on U.S. government property. The justices could also clear up years of varied and inconsistent decisions on the religious Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.

Racial gerrymandering -- Virginia House of Delegates v. Bethune Hill


When is the use of race as a factor in drawing state congressional districts unconstitutional? The court will weigh in on the balancing act state legislators face under the Voting Rights Act, which requires that race be a factor in redistricting, and the 14th Amendment, which prohibits use of race to restrict the rights of a minority group.

Race and jury selection -- Flowers v. Mississippi

Curtis Flowers -- an African American man convicted of murder -- says a Mississippi prosecutor deprived him of a fair trial and sentenced him to death by eliminating virtually all black people from jury pools in his case. After mistrials and retrials, Flowers has faced not one but an unprecedented six separate juries for the same crime. He insists he's innocent and wants an unprecedented seventh trial to try to clear his name.

Partisan gerrymandering -- Rucho v. Common Cause; Lamone v. Benisek

The Supreme Court has consistently agreed that "extreme" partisan gerrymandering -- the drawing of electoral maps to the advantage of one party over another -- is inconsistent with democratic principles. But many justices, past and present, have suggested that the issue is better left to the political system to sort out. Will the justices finally set a clear, new standard for what is constitutional and what is not?

Profanity and trademarks -- Iancu v. Brunetti

Are words like "FUCT" eligible for trademark registration because of First Amendment protection of free speech -- or is there a legitimate public interest in keeping the government disassociated from profane language?

2020 Census citizenship question -- Department of Commerce v. New York, et al

Did Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross violate the Administrative Procedures Act in moving to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census? Lower courts have said he acted illegally in an "arbitrary and capricious" manner, striking down the question. The justices will also consider if a citizenship question is itself constitutional, or whether it would so hamper an accurate count as to violate the Enumeration Clause.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump issued a strong warning to Iran Sunday, tweeting that military engagement with the United States would mean "the official end of Iran."

If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran. Never threaten the United States again!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 19, 2019

Trump's threat comes amid rising tensions between Washington and Tehran.

The New York Times reported last week that the administration was considering sending as many as 120,000 troops to the Middle East if Iran attacked "American forces or accelerate work on nuclear weapons." Trump denied the report, but added he would "send a hell of a lot more troops than that" if it happened.

When asked by a reporter on Thursday whether or not the U.S. was going to war with Iran, President Trump replied, "I hope not."

Earlier this month, the United States deployed an aircraft carrier strike group and a bomber task force to the Middle East in response to "clear indications" Iran or its proxies were planning an attack on U.S. forces in the region, U.S. officials told ABC News. The Pentagon announced on May 10 it was sending a Patriot anti-missile battery to the area as well as a further deterrent. On Wednesday, the State Department ordered all non-emergency personnel at the U.S. embassy in Baghdad and the U.S. consulate in Erbil, Iraq, to leave.

In an interview that aired earlier on Sunday, Gen. David Petraeus, the retired four-star general who led troops into battle during the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, told ABC's "This Week" Co-Anchor Martha Raddatz that he believes Trump doesn't want to go to war with Iran.

"It’s pretty clear that [Trump] doesn't want to go to war with Iran.," Petraeus said. "He’s not after regime change."

This is not the first time the president has issued a public warning to the Islamic Republic.

To Iranian President Rouhani: NEVER, EVER THREATEN THE UNITED STATES AGAIN OR YOU WILL SUFFER CONSEQUENCES THE LIKES OF WHICH FEW THROUGHOUT HISTORY HAVE EVER SUFFERED BEFORE. WE ARE NO LONGER A COUNTRY THAT WILL STAND FOR YOUR DEMENTED WORDS OF VIOLENCE & DEATH. BE CAUTIOUS!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 23, 2018

On Tuesday, Pentagon officials are expected to brief Congress about the intelligence that generated the deployment of the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln and B-52's to deter Iran.

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Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Seth Moulton, D-Mass., a 2020 presidential candidate and Iraq war veteran, released his "National Service Education Guarantee" plan Sunday to encourage young Americans to serve their country -- in the military, in AmeriCorps, in FEMA Corps or, in what he would create if elected, the "Federal Green Corps” tasked with combating climate change and helping the environment.

"[This is] the kind of forward-looking policy that I think we need to meet the challenges of a changing world, to address climate change, to bring broadband to rural communities and to say to America we need a common mission," Moulton told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on ABC's "This Week."

The Marine veteran described his plan as an investment in the future, saying "If you invest in America then America will invest in you." he said.

Modeled on the G.I. Bill, the plan would establish an education benefit for those who serve and would expand the president’s cabinet by creating a secretary position for the lead administrator of a renamed and restructured National and Community Service Administration.

Many of the 2020 presidential candidates have released education policies, with some focusing on free college tuition. But Moulton's pitch emphasizes public service and allocates money for those who serve towards education and job-training benefits, including an option for vocational schools.

Different than the selective service, Moulton said on “This Week” that the call to serve would not be mandatory.

"I’m asking all 33 million young Americans to consider serving their country … not to make it a requirement, but an expectation," he said.

Moulton said this would be the "largest call to national service since World War II."

The plan comes at a time where public service is not widely popular among Americans. There are 75,000 people currently serve with AmeriCorps and 1.3 million are active duty military personnel, which makes up roughly 0.4% of the entire U.S. population.

"It’s time for the generation that fought in Iraq and Afghanistan to take over for the generation that sent us there," Moulton told Stephanopoulos.

In a field of 23 Democratic candidates, Moulton said he has found a void his campaign could fill by focusing on public service and national security.

"I'm the only one who's really been talking about national security and taking on President Donald Trump in his job as commander in chief, and I do that with the experience of having served on the ground in combat," he said Sunday.

The three-term congressman serves on the House Armed Services Committee and has long been an advocate for fellow veterans: he created the Serve America PAC to support Democratic veterans running for office. This past year, 40 Republicans lost their seats in the U.S. House of Representatives and, of the 40 newly-elected Democrats, 21 of them were backed by the Serve America PAC.

Moulton said he doubts Trump’s ability to lead, calling the president a "weak commander in chief" who "dodged his own generation’s war" by using his father’s connections. He also criticized Trump’s national security advisor John Bolton, who served in President George W. Bush’s administration, claiming Bolton is "pushing America into Iran" like he "pushed America into Iraq" under Bush.

Pointing to his seven years in the U.S. Marine Corps, Moulton said it has "given[him] a firsthand perspective on what it takes to make America safe and strong."

Describing his time in combat, Moulton told “This Week,” "In fact, I fought Iranians on the ground in Iraq in 2004. It was bloody. We won. And if necessary, I will fight Iran again. But right now, war is not necessary."

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who has made foreign policy a central part of her campaign, said President Donald Trump is "setting the stage for a war in Iran."

"He is leading us down this dangerous path towards a war in Iran," Gabbard told ABC News' Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos on “This Week” Sunday.

On Wednesday, Gabbard told ABC News that she believed actions coming from Trump and national security adviser John Bolton, "are dangerously escalating us closer and closer towards a devastating war with Iran."

On “This Week,” Gabbard, who is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, went further, telling Stephanopoulos, "I think what we’re seeing, unfortunately, is what looks a lot like people in the Trump administration trying to create a pretext or an excuse for us to go to war against Iran."

She warned that a war in Iran "would actually undermine our national security, cost us countless American lives, cost civilian lives across the region, exacerbate the refugee crisis in Europe and it would actually make us less safe by strengthening terrorist groups like ISIS and al-Qaeda."

Also on Wednesday, as tensions continued to build, the U.S. State Department ordered all non-emergency government employees to leave the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and the U.S. Consulate in Erbil.

"We heard conflicting stories coming from the British commander who is the co-commander of the fight against ISIS and al-Qaeda there in Iraq and Syria saying, hey, he hadn’t seen an escalation of tensions or threats coming from these Iraqi -- or these Shia militias serving in Iraq," she said.

Stephanopoulos asked Gabbard about the withdrawal from the diplomatic posts, which she responded were not the result of the White House's claims of increased tension in the Middle East.

The 2020 candidate, an Iraq war veteran who also serves as a major in the Hawaii National Guard, has made clear her stance against military involvement in foreign nations.

Gabbard told Stephanopoulos, "I've also seen and experienced the cost of war firsthand. And I'm committed -- as commander in chief -- to end these wasteful regime change wars."

While Gabbard has called the president out for his rhetoric and policies, she has also adopted some of Trump’s key phrases such as "fake news."

When asked on “This Week” about a Daily Beast article that claimed her campaign received donations from "Putin Apologists," Gabbard refuted the claim and described the piece to ABC News as a "whole lot of fake news."

Stephanopoulos asked Gabbard, "many Democrats have been tougher on Vladimir Putin than President Trump. Do you think Democrats are taking too hard a line?"

She responded, "I think that the escalation of tensions that we’ve seen between the United States and nuclear-armed countries like Russia and China -- and you’re right -- it has come from this administration, it’s also come from some Democrats and Republicans in Congress."

“It has brought us to this very dangerous point where nuclear strategists point out that we are at a greater risk of nuclear war now than ever before in history and we’ve got to understand what the consequences of that are,” she added.

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Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris is expected to draw a crowd of thousands on Sunday afternoon in her home state of California at a rally at Los Angeles Southwest College. It’s there that Harris hopes to connect with one group in particular: black voters.

The school is located in the heart of South Los Angeles, and has one of the highest percentages of black students out of all the city's community colleges. Harris’ scheduled speech there is part of her broader attempt to appeal to black voters in a state that awards more than 400 Democratic delegates during the presidential primary.

African American voters are critical to gaining traction in the presidential primary, and the largely Democratic group is expected to make up 12.5% of the electorate in 2020, according to the Pew Research Center. In South Carolina, the first state to hold a primary in the South, African Americans make up nearly 30 percent of the population.

"Black voters will play a disproportionate role with helping select the Democratic Party nominee for president,” Andra Gillespie, associate professor of political science at Emory University, told ABC News in April. She added that African Americans are the most “loyal Democratic voting bloc in the United States."

Part of the voting process for many black voters will be deciding if a candidate’s policies will benefit the community. Many black progressives have raised concern about Harris’ previous positions on issues like criminal justice and financial reform.

As California’s former attorney general, Harris had a record of backing tough penalties for the parents of truant kids -- a position she later said she regretted -- and opposing federal oversight of California's prisons.

Critics of Harris say her decisions as a long-time prosecutor do not align with the progressive values of the party.

While Harris personally opposes the death penalty, she defended it as California's attorney general in 2014. She also won a $25 billion settlement for California homeowners hit by the foreclosure crisis, but drew criticism when she did not prosecute Steven Mnuchin's OneWest Bank for foreclosure violations in 2013.

To help counter some of these criticisms, Harris has focused on appealing directly to black voters, appearing on "The Breakfast Club," a morning radio show, lunching with Rev. Al Sharpton and speaking to the nation's largest NAACP chapter in Detroit.

In South Carolina, the senator spoke to over 3,000 black women at a sorority event for Alpha Kappa Alpha Inc., a historic African American organization which she joined as a college student at Howard University.

Historically black colleges and universities, such as Howard, have been at the center of Harris’ campaign. She chose the campus to host a press conference shortly after announcing her bid for president.

"Howard University is one of the most important aspects of my life. And it is where I first ran for my first elected office," Harris told reporters.

Aimee Allison, founder of She the People, a political organization for women of color, told ABC News that candidates who can successfully reach out to the black community and black women voters will be much more competitive.

"The campaign trail is littered with people who recognize too late who the most valuable voters in the coalition are,” Allison said.

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, hoping to emerge from the lower echelon of a crowded Democratic presidential primary field, appeared on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday to push his centrist message focused on reviving the American middle class.

"I'm running for president because Donald Trump has been fueling this national crisis of division, of taking our country backwards. And the answer is not socialism," Hickenlooper, drawing an implicit contrast with some of his Democratic rivals, told ABC News Chief Anchor George Stephanopolous.

"I've spent my whole life bringing people together and getting big progressive things done," Hicklenlooper said, touting his record as Colorado's chief executive. "We've achieved almost universal health care coverage. And we beat the NRA with tough, tough gun laws. I think the real challenge here is how do we get that nonsense that's taken over Washington and replace it with common sense?"

Hickenlooper, who is set to deliver a major foreign policy speech in Chicago on Monday, decried Trump's foreign policy as "isolationist and reckless," but also took swipes at some in his own party who he says "would have the United States withdraw from global engagement."

"That makes us less safe. The only way to full security is through constant engagement. And by reviving U.S. leadership, we actually make our country safer. But we also make it more prosperous," Hickenlooper argued.

He has said his major foreign policy credentials include overseeing Colorado's six military bases and forging economic relationships with countries like Israel.

Pressed on his decision to forgo a run for the U.S. Senate in 2020 and instead run for president, Hickenlooper threw cold water on the idea that he would re-consider a Senate run if his presidential bid did not pan out.

"I'd be a difficult candidate as a senator. I've spent my whole life putting teams together both as an entrepreneur in the private sector, but also as a mayor and as a governor. And by building those teams, we've been able to bring people together and do the big progressive things that people said couldn't be done," Hickenlooper said. "That's the only way we're going to ... be able to bring some common sense to Washington."

Hickenlooper has grounded his campaign in the same pragmatic approach that defined his political career, from his unlikely election as mayor of Denver through his two successful terms as Colorado's governor, and he has actively pushed back on the priorities of the progressive wing of the Democratic Party.

He is betting his problem-solver persona will ultimately be rewarded by Democratic voters.

Hickenlooper recently penned an op-ed in the Washington Post entitled "The Green New Deal sets us up for failure. We need a better approach," and followed up by the release of an economic plan rooted in his belief in a more just form of capitalism.

Thus far his campaign has struggled to break through in a Democratic field that has swelled to 23 candidates.

While he has qualified for the first Democratic primary debates based on polling, he has not met the Democratic National Committee's 65,000 individual donor threshold, making him one of a handful of candidates who could find himself left out of the crucial first debates.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Gen. David Petraeus, the retired four-star general who led troops into battle during the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, said he doesn't see parallels between the lead-up to that war and the current escalating tensions between the United States and Iran.

In an interview with ABC's "This Week" Co-Anchor Martha Raddatz, the former CIA director said he doesn't believe President Donald Trump wants to start another war in the Middle East.

"It’s pretty clear that [Trump] doesn't want to go to war with Iran. He’s not after regime change," he said in the interview, which aired Sunday morning.

Citing Secretary of State of Mike Pompeo, Petraeus added that the president's goals with Iran are more targeted.

"He's after what Secretary Pompeo has announced as the objective, which is regime behavior change," he said.

Raddatz noted that White House national security adviser John Bolton has previously advocated for regime change to end the Ayatollah's reign in the country.

"Do you think that's still being whispered in the president's ear?" she asked.

"Not after what the president said to the press the other day, certainly, if it was ever said," Petraeus said, noting that Bolton may be "a hard-liner," but on this issue, Trump "clearly is not."

At an event in the Roosevelt Room on May 9, Trump said he got "very good advice from" Bolton, but he was the one who makes the decisions in this White House.

"John is very good ... he has strong views on things, but that's OK. I actually temper John, which is pretty amazing, right?" the president said. "I have John Bolton and I have other people that are a little more dovish than him. And, ultimately, I make the decision."

Earlier this month, the United States deployed an aircraft carrier strike group and a bomber task force to the Middle East in response to "clear indications" Iran or its proxies were planning on attack on U.S. forces in the region, U.S. officials told ABC News. The Pentagon announced on May 10 it was sending a Patriot anti-missile battery to the area as well as further deterrence.

On Wednesday, the State Department ordered all non-emergency personnel at the U.S. embassy in Baghdad and the U.S. consulate in Erbil, Iraq, to leave.

Petraeus said that response was appropriate.

"This is both an effort to shore up deterrents, and also to shore up our defenses," he said in the interview.

Raddatz pressed on why this response was needed now, especially evacuating the embassy and consulate, when activity like this has happened before.

"I think this is a different situation. It's a different Iraq. It's not as hard as it was in those days," Petraeus said on "This Week."

The president has dismissed a New York Times story that reported the administration was reviewing a plan to send as many as 120,000 troops to the region if Iran attacked U.S. forces.

Even though Trump labeled the report "fake news," he also said that if that happened, he'd "send a hell of a lot more troops than that."

Petraeus said the president was "right in his assessment" that more troops would be needed. The White House denied the report, but Petraeus defended planning for such an attack.

"I think it's absolutely right that they should be examining a variety of different options. It’d be actually derelict if they did not actually prepare for whatever could come," he told Raddatz. "Iran is a country that has a population that is three times the size of Iraq when we invaded it, and a landmass that is three to four times the size of Iraq as well.

"And I think any thoughts about invading Iran -- again, rightly, the president has shelled those, I think -- that would be an enormous undertaking," he added. "And he's right in his assessment, we would need heck of a lot more troops than that, were we ever do something like that."

Lawmakers have been frustrated that the administration has not yet briefed them on the intelligence on the threat from Iran, with some questioning its validity. They compared it to the flawed intelligence asserting Iraq had weapons of mass destruction, which cleared the way for the United States to go to war in 2003.

"In Iraq there was a real momentum to go to war with Iraq, and there was intelligence, however flawed it turned out to be, that was generally assumed to be credible by the policymakers," Petraeus said. "There was an almost an article of faith that Iraq did have weapons of mass destruction of some kind and means to deliver them. I just don't see this at all similar to that."

The former chief commander of U.S. Central Command reminded Raddatz that he has "absolute enmity for" the Iranian regime, as it was responsible for hundreds of American soldiers' deaths "when I was privileged to command the surge." But he expressed hope for back-channel communications or meetings between the administration and Iran.

"President Trump has been quite clear about this. He would welcome communication, and apparently would be willing to sit down, himself," he said.

Still, when asked if it was wise to have a meeting with Iranian leaders, Petraeus added that "diplomatic preparation would be needed."

He said that with the recent activities, Iran may be trying to "stay below the threshold" that would prompt a military response.

"If exceeded, we would have to do something," he said in the interview. "And we would do something, presumably, more than they did to us."

"Do you think Iran will come to the negotiating table or cave in because of this maximum pressure campaign?" Raddatz asked.

"They are going to have to make a decision," he responded. "Can they try some kind of proxy activities? Can they make life difficult for us? They can, but they're going to be have to be very careful not to overplay their hand and result in some kind of response that is quite punitive.

"And I think this is where having President Trump in the White House, frankly, has to give them some degree of pause," he added. "Over the previous administration’s eight years, gradually they could get a sense of where the edges are and all the rest of this. I'm not quite so sure that with this White House, that there might not be a fairly substantial response to something that the Iranians might think is just a proxy activity that stays below what they think the threshold is, after which we would respond."

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